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Partner Blog

Information of use to those who serve private well owners.

Partner Interview with Janet Agnoletti, BACOG

The Private Well Class recognizes partners who have exceptional local and community programs. Janet Agnoletti and the Barrington Area Council of Governments (BACOG) in Illinois have developed a strong network with partners, useful strategies, and overcome challenges.

 

We interviewed Janet to gain insight on the inner workings of a community program and how they strive to attain success in their goals and objectives.


Q:  Can you tell me a little bit of your position, background, and what your role is at BACOG?

JA: I am the Executive Director of BACOG, and I started in this position in 2000. I have a master’s degree in City and Regional Planning from Illinois Institute of Technology. I worked as a planner for the City of Evanston in my early career and then as a consultant to a number of suburban communities and not-for-profits. My interests have always included environmental issues – which are a critical consideration in regional land planning..

Q:  Can you talk a little about what BACOG is and what it does in respect to water resource initiatives?

JA: The Barrington Area Council of Governments (BACOG) was formed in 1970, and it is a regional planning organization comprised of local government members in the northwest suburban area (of Chicago). The organization addresses: planning, development and land use issues; environmental matters including groundwater; legislative advocacy; regional emergency preparedness; training, workshops and networking for members; and intergovernmental collaboration and communications. 

I started the groundwater initiative in 2001; while most natural resources had been extensively studied in the early decades of BACOG, there was little information about groundwater. In the BACOG region of approximately 80-90 square miles, the vast majority of wells – maybe 99% -- are finished in the shallow aquifer system. There are over 7,800 wells here, most of which are private residential wells. With one exception, all the municipal wells are in the shallow aquifer system too. So my goal in 2001 was to study this resource, to identify where the water is, how much there is, what its quality is, and if it is sustainable. We have accomplished a great deal of this work and more.

Q:  Who is BACOG’s primary audience?

JA: The municipal and township members of BACOG guide, support, adopt and participate in BACOG’s programs. As a group of regional governments, they can do more research and programming, and do it more cost-efficiently, than if each government acted independently. They do this on behalf of the residents of the entire region. BACOG’s programs benefit our government members with data, tools, advocacy and innovations, for instance, and some of 

BACOG’s programs directly benefit residents of the area such as BACOG’s private well water testing. Our recent project, the groundwater video for elementary school students, benefits children as well.

Q:  What sort of programs does BACOG offer to well owners/members in the community?

JA: BACOG offers private well water testing, a Level 1 program for bacteria and nitrates and a Level 2 program for natural water quality. We work in partnership with Lake County Health Department for Level 1, and with Illinois State Water Survey laboratory for Level 2. 

At each Level 1 event, we provide education in the form of resources, materials, and groundwater experts to answer questions to residents who participate. We also provide education through a presentation by experts at every water testing event, and from time-to-time at special groundwater programs for the public. During the year, BACOG provides educational materials to the public, both directly and through newsletter and website articles for our members to share. Materials are always available at events and the BACOG office about aquifers, groundwater, well and septic maintenance, bacteria in water systems, etc. BACOG has developed four brochures to date on water topics that are widely distributed. 

Our recent groundwater video project offers the video, a “Skype with a Scientist” session following the video viewing, and maps and materials for use in the classroom, including loan of a custom-built aquifer model (sand, gravel, water) for teachers to demonstrate in the classroom. The video includes information about wells, septic systems and aquifers.

Watch the video below:


Q:  What sort of outreach approaches does BACOG utilize and how are you doing that outreach?

JA: We advertise and promote our testing programs widely in the community, in press releases and articles that are sent to the news media, in newsletter articles and announcements that are used by our member governments in their publications and websites, and through cooperative local organizations and businesses distributing materials for us. 

BACOG has a Water Resources Committee that is comprised of representatives from every member government and from regional conservation organizations, and individuals who are interested and bring environmental/other expertise to the study of water. Their involvement provides another avenue for promotion of BACOG activities to their own residents, members and neighbors. 

The WRC also has six “member advisors” who are professionals primarily from the State Water and Geological Surveys, who provide advice to me as I develop new programs for our region. We share data collected here with the Surveys.

Q:  In your opinion, what type of program/outreach approach to well owners has been the most successful and why?

JA: When BACOG first unveiled its aquifer study and mapping project, community members were not as interested in the hydrogeology of the local groundwater source as they were in the region’s (and their own) groundwater quality. So I refocused our educational efforts to the questions we heard most, and that was the impetus for creating the private well water testing program. 

It has been a great success, and we attract 350-400 households to each test event and in the process share a great deal of information and materials about wells, septic systems, the local aquifers and hydrogeology, maintenance and repair, water quality and treatment systems, salting techniques, the BACOG water levels monitoring program, etc. We pique their interest with the testing, and we inundate them with education! 

I did a little analysis with Lake County Health Department last year, where we showed that BACOG-area residents were testing their well water at the county at a rate over 600% greater than before we started the BACOG program. I know that the fact that BACOG has provided the testing program, educational resources, promotion through the media and our governments, projects like the new video, and a consistent positive message about groundwater has made a big difference. People better understand the need to be informed about and protective of their own regional water resource.

Q:  Do you work with any local/state/federal partners and how have those partners helped BACOG’s goals and objectives?

JA: BACOG is fortunate to have worked with the Illinois State Water Survey, the Illinois State Geological Survey, and the U.S. Geological Survey in one capacity or another over the years. We also have worked with Lake County Health Department professional staff for information, educational assistance, input, speakers and partnership. We continue to work with a private hydrogeologist who was instrumental in designing programs and advising on water supply, quality and sustainability since 2001. 

  • Our hydrogeologist from KOT Environmental Consulting contributed many hours of work and advice to designing and creating the aquifer study and mapping project, the groundwater recharge map, and other groundwater programs.  
  • Lake County Health Department has been a tremendous resource (and WRC member) in providing statistical data, education, and other input to BACOG’s programs. 
  • The Surveys’ professional staff input and advice to our programs has been invaluable, and they have provided speakers for community events and to the Executive Board in support of BACOG projects. 
  • The ISGS developed 18 new monitoring wells in the BACOG area about 10 years ago with support and assistance from our staff and government members, and we now use those wells for annual water level measurements under our monitoring program. In years that BACOG could not take measurements in those wells, the USGS provided staff to do so.
  • The ISWS included wells in the BACOG area in its Kane County study, which provided a baseline of water levels for 2003. 
  • The partnership with ISWS for the BACOG Level 2 water quality testing makes our program credible, easy and affordable to residents, and the same is true of the Level 1 partnership with Lake County. 

Additionally, our WRC representatives from organizations such as Citizens for Conservation, the Barrington Area Development Council, the Garden Clubs Council, the Barrington Rotary, and companies such as Angel Water Inc. and Baxter Woodman Engineers have provided invaluable service and work in support of BACOG programs. A few of BACOG’s goals are: to better understand and inform the public about the shallow aquifer system, our primary source of water; to develop data-based information about aquifer water supply and quality; to provide tools and programs that will help protect groundwater supply and quality; and to help residents keep their private well water safe and clean.


Q:  What is the largest challenge for BACOG and how have you been addressing that challenge?

JA: Probably the biggest challenge is funding, which has not been available from state or federal sources for groundwater programs. BACOG programs have been entirely funded by our local government members. One recent exception is the granting of electronic equipment from USGS for three wells in the aquifer water level monitoring program. Other than this, all BACOG’s groundwater programs have been member-funded since inception of the initiative in 2001, despite best efforts to obtain outside grant funds. 


To learn more about BACOG's current and continuing efforts, you can visit their website at: 
BACOG (Barrington Area Council of Governments) 


Partner Interview with Sarah Puls, Lane County Environmental Health

The Private Well Class helps partners understand the value in forming meaningful relationships to create successful private well programs. Sarah Puls and Lane County Environmental Health in Oregon have established a meaningful relationship with two local high schools. Together, they have created a high school water well screening program to better serve Lane County private well owners. In this program, water testing is conducted by high school science students as part of a hands-on water quality program, with teacher/staff guidance and oversight.

We interviewed Sarah to highlight how one of our partners and their affiliated organization helped to develop an extraordinarily unique program. 


Q: Sarah, can you give me a little bit of your professional background and what your current position entails?

SP: I am a Registered Environmental Health Specialist for Lane County Environmental Health.  I lead the Drinking Water Program for Lane County.  This is a State of Oregon program that is regulated at the county level.  We regulate public groundwater systems that are 3,300 in population and smaller.  We also have a domestic well safety program to provide outreach and education to domestic well users in Lane County.

Q: Can you explain how your private well water testing program works?

SP: The program is ran through two high schools in Lane County.  Both schools have designated dates each month during the school year  for their water screening lab days,  residents can pick up a sample collection kit at various locations throughout the county and are then required to bring their water sample to the school for testing on that designated day.  Marist High School does screening for coli form/ E.coli, nitrates, arsenic, conductivity and pH.  Thurston High School does screening for coli form/ E.coli, arsenic, nitrates, copper, iron, hardness, pH, conductivity, and turbidity.  Results are mailed or e-mailed to the customers comparing their water to the EPA drinking water quality standards.  People with water quality parameters exceeding EPA drinking water quality standards are given educational materials and information to contact Lane County Environmental Health Drinking Water Program with questions. Both labs recommend any exceedances be confirmed by resampling with an accredited laboratory.

Q: How was this program and high school partnership developed?

SP: Thurston High School has had this program for a number of years and has partnered with Lane County and other community stakeholders in the past to get updated equipment and expand their water lab program. In 2014 Lane County Environmental Health revived the domestic well safety program at the county level and  partnered with Marist High School to assist them in developing a well water screening laboratory that will be student ran to provide free water screening to domestic well users. There was a need to provide free and low cost water screening options,  we would receive a number of calls a month from concerned citizens who were on a well and did not have the means to spend hundreds of dollars on water testing. 

Q: Who actually collects the water and who performs the water sample analysis?

SP: Water sample collection kits are located at various locations throughout Lane County for residents to pick up,  directions on how to collect the sample are included in the kit along with testing dates and instructions on where and when to drop off the water samples.  Residents are to collect their own samples and deliver the bottle to the school for testing.  Students are involved in all aspects of the sample processing and testing.

Q: How many samples have been analyzed/approximately how many well owners have been helped?

SP: That is a great question, unfortunately I do not have that data.  I will have to get a hold of the schools to see how many samples they ran last year or even for the program in general to date.  If I had to guesstimate,  it would probably be around 200 samples during the school year for each school,  which is probably a low number!

Q: How often are the samples analyzed (school year)?

SP: Samples are tested one day a month at each school during the school year.

Q: What was your biggest challenge in establishing this program/partnership?

SP: The biggest challenge for both schools is  funding to purchase equipment and supplies.  The two high schools got together to talk about their individual programs and ended up being able to reuse lab equipment from Thurston’s established program for Marist's new program.  Advertising was also a hurdle for this project so people would know that these programs are out there for them to utilize.  The schools used their website along with the County website and bought some advertising in local papers. Once the program got some information out there it proved to provide them with enough samples to run each month. 

Q: How successful is your program and what could you contribute to your program’s success?

SP: I would say this program is a great success because it fulfilled a huge need in our community.  We have only one accredited laboratory in Lane County that is open to the public and the County no longer has a water quality testing laboratory.  Both schools provide well-managed low cost programs for the local residents that fill the need for the large number of people in our county who are on domestic wells who cannot afford to have their water tested and it provides a great experience for the students in these schools to learn about the Environmental Health field.

 

To learn more about the high school well testing programs, you can visit their websites at: 
Marist High School 
Thurston High School 


 

FAQ: "Water from a Public Water Supply versus a Private Well?"

Question

What are the differences between getting water from a public water supply (PWS) versus from a private well?

Answer

The public water supply is regulated so that the water being served to their customers is safe to drink.  A private well is not regulated and as the well owner, it is their responsibility to make sure the water is safe to drink.

Water from a public water supply must be tested to ensure it meets the USEPA Safe Water Act Regulations. The water is sampled at regular intervals for priority contaminants as identified by the USEPA.  These harmful constituents all have maximum contaminant levels (MCL’s) that are allowed by law, so the public water supply can only serve water that is below the MCL’s for all of the priority contaminants.  The primary drinking water standards can be found here:  https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water/table-regulated-drinking-water-contaminants. A private well generally has no legal requirements for water quality, and in general most health professionals recommend that the water quality of a private well meet the MCL’s, but that is simply a suggestion.  There may be some sampling requirements when a property is sold that has a well, and when a new well is drilled, but there is no continuing requirement to maintain a specific water quality of a private well like there is for a PWS.

A public water supply is required to have a responsible operator in charge (ROIC) who has a legal responsibility to make sure the water is safe. They have a water operator’s license, which they obtained by passing an operators exam, and they have to maintain that license by taking continuing education classes as required by their state/ jurisdiction.  A private well owner is solely responsible for the maintenance and safety of their water supply.

The homeowner pays a fee for their water when they are hooked up to a PWS.  That fee, spread across all of the customers of the PWS, pays for the operator and their staff, sampling costs, maintenance costs to provide water to the home, and for any treatment needed to remove harmful contaminants to below the levels identified by the MCL’s.  For a homeowner with a private well, you are solely responsible for all costs related to testing, maintaining, and running your water system.

If you have a choice, we recommend hooking up to a PWS.  Having a professional overseeing the water you drink is generally safer, and you are sharing the costs with everyone else on the same PWS.  HUD and FHA loans require that you look to a PWS for water, if it is feasible, for just that reason.  It ensures a safe water supply that is regulated.  Many private well owners are so because they have no choice, there is no PWS nearby to hook onto.  That’s ok, there are 14 million private wells in use in the US, and the vast majority provide a safe, steady supply of water.  It just means that a private well owner has to be a responsible steward of their well and water supply.  They have to understand how their well works, how to maintain their well, and what steps are necessary to ensure a safe water supply. 

Partner Interview with Dr. Jason Barrett, MSU Extension

The Private Well Class works closely with many partners to get information out to the public about their private wells. At the Mississippi State University Extension, Jason R. Barrett is one of those partners. Dr. Barrett is an Assistant Extension Professor with the Mississippi State University Extension Center for Government and Community Development and he works in the areas of community development, economics and natural resources, water and waste water utilities, and municipal public. 

We interviewed Dr. Barrett to highlight how one of our partners incorporates the Private Well Class into his programming and how he reaches and interacts with the public in his role at the Mississippi State University Extension.

 

Q: Can you tell me a little bit about yourself and how you came to work at MSU Extension?

JRB:  I completed a graduate assistantship with MSU Extension in the Food and Fiber department in 2001 and 2002.  After those years, I realized that I enjoyed extension work and had a strong desire to return.  I took a fulltime position with MSU Extension in January 2007 and have been here since.

Q: What does a normal day usually entail (in respect to your job)?

JRB:  I usually spend the first hour or two of the morning reading and responding to emails, making a list of items I need to address, prioritizing that list, and either working on a publication, scheduling a workshop/training, and/or compiling a technical assistance report.

Q: What is your favorite thing about your job?

JRB:  I enjoy getting on the road and in the field.  I enjoy working with people to assist or resolve their real issue(s).  I like seeing tangible results.

Q: How often do you put on a workshop in different counties throughout Mississippi?

JRB:  I am in the process of planning the next three (3) which will take place over the next six (6) months which will follow one (1) every other month.

Q: What do the workshops include?

JRB:  The past workshops have had three (3) components; Mr. Steve Wilson talking about “Water Quality and Your Private Well”, a local well drilling expert talking about water well construction, and then I finish with a few topics including ‘Protecting Your Private Well’, ‘Private Well Water Testing’, and statewide contacts for assistance and knowledge about your private well.

Q: How exactly do you incorporate the Private Well Class into your workshops?

JRB:  I make a packet for each attendee and I give them copies of my publications related to private water wells and I always place the “Private Well Class” flyer on top of the packet plus Mr. Wilson promotes the class at the end of his presentation time.

Q: What made you decide to incorporate the Private Well Class into the workshop?

JRB:  The Private Well Class is a wealth of resources, publication, and information.  If someone is working with citizens in relation to private water wells and they are not using the Private Well Class, they are doing themselves and the citizens a disservice.

Q: Other than the workshops, do you offer any other events, services, etc. for well owners?

JRB:  We are planning for this year to incorporate bacteria testing for private well owners that attend our workshops.  I think it is necessary to offer testing to residents.  We talk about it so much in our publications and workshops and then we have to point them in another direction to actually get their water tested.  I think it only makes sense to incorporate it into future education and outreach.

Q: What kinds of people typically attend the workshops?

JRB:  Private well owners that are looking for answers.  Most of the people we see have a private well because they do not have another option for drinking water.

Q: What is the primary reason that people attend the workshop (can you be more specific than they want to learn more about their well)?

JRB:  A lot of interest and questions revolve around; how do I know my water is safe, where can I get my water tested, what should I be testing for, etc.

Q: What do you think is the most valuable thing that attendees get out of the workshop?

JRB:  They get tangible publications to use for reference, they get contact information from myself, Mr. Steve Wilson, and the local well drilling expert to use for any future questions or technical assistance.  They get to know that there are people that can and will help them.

Q: Is there any other follow up or services that you assist with after the workshop is over (testing, inspection, etc.)?

JRB:  As I stated earlier, we are planning to incorporate testing into our future workshops this year.  I want private well owners to have the peace of mind from knowing their drinking water is free from bacteria.

 

FAQ: "What Should I Sample For?"

Question

How often should I sample my well, and what should I sample for?

Answer

Testing your water regularly is probably the most important thing you can do to protect you and your family’s health.  In most cases, groundwater is completely safe to drink, but sometimes there are naturally occurring contaminants in groundwater, and many older wells do not properly protect from possible surface contamination and can lead to well contamination.  
  

What to sample for can vary based on well depth, known naturally occurring contaminants, and local concerns.  Including the list of things we recommend, you should contact your local health agency and ask them what they suggest. It might also be helpful to contact your local cooperative extension office or driller to ask if they know of any concerns in your area. In some states, one or more state agencies might have information on water quality that will be helpful.  Below are two examples. In Massachusetts, you can type in your address, and the system will let you know if you are at risk for Arsenic or Uranium (Figure 1), and in Rhode Island, the middle of the state has a beryllium issue (Figure 2). Investigate, so you aren’t surprised later.  We have had more than one well owner contact us, upset that they didn’t know there was an issue in their area, like arsenic, until after they purchased their home.

    

Fig 1. From the Massachusetts DEP website

 
 
From the Rhode Island Dept of Health (large pink splotch in the middle of the state)

We recommend sampling for nitrate and coliform bacteria annually. These constituents are common and provide an indicator that there is likely a pathway into your well from or near the surface. In some cases they can indicate contamination from your septic system or from livestock, which should not happen if your well is properly located and constructed.  The point of sampling annually for these two relatively inexpensive constituents is they will point out an immediate problem that should be dealt with. If you do have coliform bacteria in your well, you should not drink it until disinfected, and you should also test for E. coli as a follow up. Contact your local or state health agency, and they can give you follow up recommendations.

We also suggest sampling for the following constituents once every 3 -5 years.  Again, we recommend you contact your local health agency for advice and additional information.  The goals we all share are safeguarding public health and source water protection. Sampling for the constituents below will give a water quality professional a lot of valuable information about your well water, including its corrosiveness and other information needed to make treatment decisions.
 
Arsenic Fluoride
Iron Sulfate
Lead Hardness
Manganese pH
Chloride Turbidity
Total Dissolved Solids Copper (if copper piping)
Zinc and Cadmium (if galvanized piping in home or well)

FAQ: "What is a Well Log?"

Question

Where can I obtain my well log and what information does it contain?

Answer

Depending on your location, your state or county health department, Department of Natural Resources, or some other similar agency may house well logs that you can access or request a log from. If you know who drilled your well, it might be a good first step to contact them and ask for your log. They should be able to provide a copy to you. If not, search online for ‘“your state” well construction code’ and the relevant state agency should come up. Call them, and find out what agency houses well logs, if any, and that will get you on your way.

You will need to know the legal description of the well location, and additional information that will be helpful include the drilling company that installed the well, the depth, the date drilled, and the original owner, if not you. In some states, only the owner can request the log, but in others it is public information. ;There are a number of states, including Illinois, that have websites with interactive maps that allow you to zoom into your location and see what logs are available, as well as other information in some cases, like water quality information.

The problem many well owners find is that there log is not on file with these agencies. The laws have changed over time, but 40+ years ago, most states did not require a driller to get a permit or file a log, so if you have an older well, the drilling company might be your only hope. In these cases, if there is information that you really need, like pump or well depth, it might be that you need a contractor to come out and determine this for you.

As far as what is on a well log, this also varies by state and jurisdiction. Below is a well log from Illinois, and this is what we can say about this well based solely on the log. This is a 318 ft deep well, constructed with 314 ft of PVC and a 4’ stainless steel screen at the bottom. The water bearing unit is course gray sand from 307-318 feet below land surface. Sim’s Drilling Company drilled the well for Tom Parrett, the land owner. It shows the legal description of the location as well as the location in decimal degrees. The static water level is 140 ft below land surface, meaning there is about 180 feet of water in the well. They installed a 18 gpm submersible pump at 200 ft, meaning there is about 60 feet of water over the pump. It’s for domestic (home) use, the well was completed on 8-3-06, and the pump was installed on 9-6-06. They grouted the annulus from 5 feet below land surface to 148 feet below land surface as well.


If you are able to retrieve your well log, hopefully it has at least this information. It really does differ by jurisdiction.

Bernalillo County’s Private Well Program, A Surging Success

What started off as a few workshops and PowerPoint slides has evolved into full-fledged private well program for Bernalillo County, New Mexico. Sara Chudnoff, the county hydrogeologist, launched her current private well outreach program in 2013 with a few workshop presentations for local well owners. Now, she helps monitor water levels in over 200 wells and will host the second annual Bernalillo County Water Fair.

The New Mexico Environmental Department’s Groundwater Quality Bureau and the New Mexico Department of Health have received grants from two federal agencies, U.S. EPA and CDC, to fund water fairs throughout the state of New Mexico . This funding supports the water testing component of Bernalillo County’s program. Chudnoff recognizes that this collaboration is foundation to the program’s success. She says: “As a county we are the catalyst that brings it all together, but without the willingness of our partner agencies we would not be able to accomplish this work.”

The success of the Bernalillo County program is a model that any County Health Department or County Cooperative Extension can follow. The first step is obtaining appropriate resources and information – Sara, for example, began teaching her initial workshops with materials provided by the Private Well Class. This year’s Water Fair will feature a free 2-hour short course for well owners.

In addition to offering a workshop-style learning environment, Bernalillo County’s annual Water Fair offers a unique outreach opportunity for resident well owners. Hosted in conjunction with other state, federal, and local agencies, the Water Fair features an expo with information on a variety of issues faced by well owners from well permitting to understanding hydrogeology. The two day event will also offer free water testing to Bernalillo County residents not connected to a public water supply.

In publicizing an event such as this one, listing the agencies that will be present and what services that are being offered (such as free testing) is also effective at drawing in the targeted audience. The county’s brochure ensures that attendees know how to participate by including specific instructions on how to correctly collect a water sample from their home, where to take it during the event, and what additional well information should be included.

Counties interested in starting their own program and want assistance in getting off the ground can contact Sara, who is willing to talk with others and offer valuable insight. She emphasizes that workshops and classes aren’t always enough; the key is developing partnerships with other state and local stakeholders. “There are many great resources in our state and very knowledgeable experts we work with to strengthen county programs and our outreach efforts,” Chudnoff says.




For information and tips on how to get your program off the ground, contact Sara at schudnoff@bernco.gov or (505) 224-1614 and visit bernco.gov/berncowaterfair or more information.

NEHA Offers Free Accredited Private Well Class for Sanitarians

The Private Well Class, partnering with the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) and the Rural Community Assistance Partnership (RCAP), is excited to announce that NEHA now offers The Private Well Class as a 10-lesson course on their e-Learning website. Each lesson is available for one Continuing Education (CE) Credit from NEHA for any credential program that accepts NEHA CE Credits. The course is completely free, and each lesson can be taken independently.

Over the last 3+ years that The Private Well Class has been available, many environmental health professionals have contacted us about getting CE Credits for taking the class. Because the class was developed for well owners, there was no mechanism developed to provide CE Credits. We are excited to be able to offer this alternative for the many professionals working with well owners.

How to Access the Course

To access the course, you need to register on the NEHA e-Learning website, following the steps below. If you are already registered for the free NEHA courses, you can skip step 1 and proceed to the login screen.

Step 1. Complete this form to create a username and password for NEHA's free courses.

Step 2. Upon login, visit the FREE EPA, CDC, and FDA Sponsored Courses page (if you were not already directed there). Scroll to the bottom and look for the list of sub-categories and click on "Water Quality".

Step 3. Scroll down to the Private Well Course, WQ1601. Click on that title to get to the course material shown below.

Step 4. For each lesson, view and download the lesson, then take the quiz. You have to get 70% to pass.  Please contact us at info@privatewellclass.org if you have any questions about the course.

FAQ: "Do Septic Additives Work?"

Question

Should I use any additives in my septic system?

Answer

The short answer is no. A septic system works best on its own as long as it is maintained and the wastewater going through it is from normal household use. There is a huge market for additives claiming to make it function better or prolonging the life of the system, but research and experts agree, that its best to leave it alone, the bacteria we add naturally work best and don't need any help.

We interviewed a number of well and septic experts, and looked for actual research to support or refute claims of the benefits of additives. We found nothing definitive about the benefits of additives, but a number of things about the potential harm additives can cause, especially some chemical additives.

Two good resources on the subject are from the Purdue Cooperative Extension and the National Environmental Services Center (NESC), both of which are discussed below.  We also talked with 2 private well experts who manage state programs that work directly with well owners. Both said they, and other experts they have discussed this with, agree that there is no evidence to support that additives provide any benefit. They added that there is evidence that some chemical additives can damage the natural bacteria populations in a septic tank or allow solids to get into a septic field. Lastly, we contacted the USEPA, and their response followed suit, “Proper care and maintenance every 3-5 years (pumping the tank to remove solids) is recommended. All additives do is give the homeowner a false sense of security that their system will be fine if they add it.”

When we first answered this question as part of a septic webinar we conducted in the summer of 2015, we received a bunch of emails from homeowners who swear by their additives and some claimed to only pump their tank every 10 or 20 years. One stated that they had never had to pump their septic tank. We were given websites that provided “evidence” of a particular products success, even videos showing how they work. The problem with all of these testimonials are that the conditions of the testing are not the natural conditions in a tank. There was evidence to support these products under actual conditions in a septic system. These folks are likely in for a surprise at some point when their septic system fails and they either have septic effluent pooling in their backyard, or worse, backing up into their home. Also consider that in some cases the money spent on additives over a 3-5 year period would have likely paid for pumping and inspecting their tank.

Additional Resources

Purdue Extension - This handout does a great job of giving an overview of what the functions of a septic system are and how additives might affect it. It describes the types of additives that are out there, and how their use might impact a septic tank. They recommend good “habits” for how to improve performance of a septic system, by reducing the chemicals used every day that might harm the bacteria in a septic system, and best practices for reducing the amount of flow going through a system.  Improving daily habits can go a long way at preserving the proper function of a septic system.

NESC’s Small Flows Clearinghouse and Magazine - The National Environmental Services Center at West Virginia University has a national technical assistance hotline. The article at the link above was developed from calls they received from homeowners asking about additives for their septic systems. They describe some of the findings from several research studies on additives, but the question we are interested in, “Do I need to use additives…” is the last section on the 2nd page. My favorite statement, “Contrary to popular belief, yeast, dead chickens, possums, or raw hamburger do not need to be added to the septic tank”, pretty much sums up the folklore and home remedies that have made their way into this conversation.

Note: Hideyuki Terashima at the Illinois State Water Survey did all of the legwork to find and put together the resources used here on this topic. We originally used this information as part of a webinar on septic system issues in May 2015. As part of that webinar, we had a licensed septic installer and inspector participate in answering well owner questions.

New NHDES Online Tool Helps Well Owners Understand Their Water Sample Results

The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) has developed a new free tool, the Be Well Informed Guide, for interpreting private well water testing results. Although the tool was developed for residents of New Hampshire, it's available to anyone. The tool provides an evaluation of water samples, identifying results that are over the USEPA maximum contaminal level (MCL), and can also recommend possible treatment options based on the sample results provided. The Be Well Informed Guide evaluates the pollutants that are part of the “Standard Analysis,” which is the group of commonly found pollutants is listed in the NHDES Private Well Brochure.

How the Tool Works

With water testing results in hand, all you need to do is go to the site and enter results from a laboratory report. You will then receive an evaluation of well water quality and, if necessary, possible water treatment options.



We entered an arsenic result of 15ppb (the USEPA MCL is 10ppb) in the example below. The tool allows you to use common units, so it’s much less likely a well owner will put in the incorrect units from their lab report.


We didn’t put in any other results, just arsenic, and when we hit “Submit”, got the following screen:



This illustrates that the tool is quite robust. Often the appropriate treatment options for a single contaminant, like arsenic, can depend on the overall chemistry of the water. Here the tool asks for more information to give you the best suggestion. We hit “continue”, and went on to the results shown below.





Based on your results, the tool will tell you if the value you entered meets, exceeds, or is close to the (federal) drinking water limit for public water supplies. Along with a detailed interpretation of your results, the tool will also identify health concerns and offer potential treatment options.

Access the Be Well Informed Guide.

Be sure to read all of the information related to use of the site. Also, please remember that The Private Well Class recommends using tools like this for an initial understanding of your test results. You should always take your results to a qualified health professional, such as your county or state health department, for the best advice.